Is 3D Mammography more effective in detecting breast cancer?

Posted on Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Dr. Jean Seely and Dugald Seely / Dre Jean Seely et Dugald Seely

Dr. Jean Seely and Dr. Dugald Seely

Researchers from The Ottawa Hospital Breast Health Centre and the Ottawa Integrative Cancer Center (OICC) have opened the Ottawa site of the Lead-In to the Tomosynthesis Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (TMIST). The Breast Health Centre is one of three clinical trial sites to launch the Lead-In in Canada. It is expected that shortly this trial will be integrated into a larger U.S./Canada TMIST, managed by the ECOG-ACRIN Cooperative Clinical Trials Group. 

TMIST is the first large randomized, multi-centre study to assess whether a novel “3D” digital tomosynthesis technology combined with 2D digital mammography may be more effective at reducing the incidence of advanced breast cancers than conventional 2D mammography alone. Previous smaller studies suggest that this new kind of mammography can increase breast cancer detection and reduce the rate of false positives and recalls for women who do not have cancer. If successful, implementation of this technology would provide greater assurance of an effective test, reduce patient stress and anxiety, and ultimately reduce costs to the health-care system. The current Lead-In study aims to enroll 6,300 women in Canada, including 2,000 from Ottawa. Women attending mammographic screening at the Breast Health Centre may be approached to participate. 

“Tomosynthesis is the most advanced and exciting technology for mammography,” said Dr. Jean Seely, Head of Breast Imaging at the Breast Health Centre, associate professor at the University of Ottawa and lead investigator of TMIST Lead-In in Ottawa. “When the full study begins, it will be the largest and most important study to evaluate both 3D and 2D mammography technology together. Outcomes of the study will allow us to decide how we move forward from 2D to 3D screening. Our goal is to improve on ways to detect important cancers as early as possible in order to save lives.”

Read the full release

Media inquiries

Amélie Ferron-Craig
Media Relations Officer
Cell: 613-863-7221
aferronc@uOttawa.ca

Back to top